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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
're seeing it happen in great britain. the idea that scotland yard and the prime minister and, you know, journalists at "news of the world" -- >> i feel like it's people whether you read the wiki leaks things or -- you go, of course, of course, and then some of the sex scanned always, of course he was sending a pictures of himself, or you see, of course, of course they're hacking. it's one of those things like where it's your worst fear, but it keeps getting confirmed. >> what it shows me is my how tame my own formr form of journalism is. i do think for murdoch, when you talk to folks like eliot spitzer, but there's a real threat to his fcc licenses, because bribing northeastern people if you're a u.s.-based company means you have vulnerability. >> if you're not familiar, which we're all kind of learning this away, america has the law called 9 foreign corrupt practices act, which means if you do business in america, and you exhibit corrupt behavior of some kind, paying bribes, in a foreign land, so let's say you're an oil company bribing somebody in russia to get access to an oil field,
for scotland yard gave testimony that shows how big this scandal has become. they say they have a list of 4,000 potential victims and additional 5,000 phone numbers that need to be analyzed and so far they've only notified 170 people. with daily accusations piling up and the list of high-profile targets including a former prime minister and the royal family, growing longer and longer, british parliament has decided it wants to hear directly from those in charge. rupert murdock, his son james, chief execive, and executive prebekaa brooks, has been asked to testify next week in front of parliament. >> what's really interesting is that until now, rupe rupert mur was confident that all parties are going to support him. now they're all turning against him. >> reporter: murdoch shut down the "news of the world" because of what was described as toxic culture. but the company is fighting back against allegations involving two of the other papers, "the sun" and "the sunday times." they wanted to get a 2006 article about his child's cystic fi breaux says, suggesting their methods may have been illega
as scotland yard alleges, murdoch's company may have broken u.s. law. >> news corp is an american corporation and they are bound by american laws regardless of where the offense takes place. >> reporter: u.s. politicians are also latching on to an unconfirmed report from an unnamed source that "news of the world" hacked phones belonging to 9/11 victims. >> anyone who did this really forget the legality, just in terms of the morality of this is just beyond the pale. >> reporter: the 9/11 allegation appeared on sunday in light of congressional concerns, we called news international, the subsidiary and they told us they have seen no evidence that those allegations are true. >> stephanie gosk in london this morning. thanks as always. martin bashir, it's good to have you here. sometimes when i have you, i like to ask the simplest question first because i like your take. you spend a lot of time as a journalist in the u.k. and here in the united states. >> i worked for the sunday times between 1984 and 1985. >> as you've watched this story unfold over the last month or so, what jumps out at you? >>
been four high-profile resignations, including the top brass of scotland yard, and ten arrests. each new day drops a new bombshell. on monday, it was the death of sean hoare, the first journalist to go on the record pointing the finger directly at former "news of the world" editor andy colson accusing him of actively encouraging phone hacking. police say his death is unexplained, but not suspicious. and in an ironic twist, the company accused of hacking got hacked themselves. murdoch's son paper had to quickly remove this fake headline on its paper last night. today's story makes no mention of parliament or their boss, rupert murdoch. the questioning is expected to take about three hours, but don't expect any detailed answers to direct questions about phone hacking. all three have said they will not answer questions that could in some way jeopardize the ongoing criminal investigation. matt? >> all right. stephanie gosk in london this morning. stephanie, thanks so much. michael wolff is the author of "the man who owns the news: inside the secret world of rupert murdoch." he is also th
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)